MU ALERT ISSUED

Dr. Tonya-Marie Howe

Associate Professor

Literature & Languages

Back
Tonya-Marie Howe

Contact Information

Contact via email

703-284-5762

Butler Hall, G126

Academic Credentials

B.A. James Madison University
M.A., Ph.D. University of Michigan

Teaching Areas

  • Eighteenth-century British literature
  • Early modern world literature
  • Theater history
  • Writing
  • Critical theory
  • Digital humanities
  • Research methodologies

Research Interests

  • Data visualization and digital humanities
  • Early 18th-century British literature
  • Popular culture and performance history
  • Disability studies
  • Horror film

 

Websites


http://cerisia.cerosia.org
http://thowe.pbworks.com

Committed to a technologically and publicly informed critical pedagogy, Dr. Howe teaches at both the graduate and the undergraduate levels. She teaches composition, literary analysis for majors, critical theory, early modern world literature, the 18th century novel, Restoration and 18th century theater history, visual and cultural studies, and research methodologies. Her research focuses on 18th-century British cultural studies, embodied genres, and digital humanities.
 
Dr. Howe is currently Associate Professor of Literature. Specializing in the study of popular performance genres, she presents widely at national conferences in eighteenth-century studies and digital humanities (she is an avid THATcamper). She is currently developing an open-source TEI database application, Novels in Context, which seeks to make freely-accessible a curated collection of scholarly and critically-annotated resources about the 18th-century English novel for teachers and students. Recent publications include “‘All deformed Shapes’: Figuring the Posture-Master as Popular Performer in Early Eighteenth-Century England” (Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies), "Crawlspace and the Kinski Swerve" (Klaus Kinski, Beast of Cinema), and "Abject, Delude, Create: Aesthetic Self-Consciousness in Early Eighteenth-Century Farce" (Eighteenth-Century Theatre Research).

 

x