MU ALERT ISSUED

Dr. Megan McFarlane

Assistant Professor

Communication

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Megan McFarlane

Contact Information

Contact via email

703-284-1688

Academic Credentials

B.A., Vanguard University of Southern California
M.A., California State University, Fullerton
Ph.D., University of Utah

Teaching Areas

  • Public Speaking
  • Broadcast Writing and Delivery
  • Career and Professional Communication
  • Media & Rhetorical Criticism
  • Women’s & Gender Studies

Research Interests

  • Rhetoric
  • Media Studies
  • Women’s & Gender Studies
  • U.S. Military

Bio

Dr. Megan McFarlane joined the faculty at Marymount in 2016. Her research examines mediated representations of—and the rhetoric surrounding—three primary areas: women and gender, race and intersectionality, and political communication. In terms of women and gender, her research is often within the context of the U.S. military. This is the primary focus of her current research project, which focuses on active duty servicewomen’s pregnancy experiences. Dr. McFarlane also studies the problem of sexual assault in the U.S. military and on U.S. university campuses. She has also researched gender, race, and intersectionality in the film, The Help, as well as the television series, Scandal. Regarding her analyses of political communication, her research has looked at representations relating to the presidency, U.S. military, and national security. 

She enjoys the DC area, which offers her many opportunities to continue her research. She also appreciates the many cultural, intellectual, and networking experiences and opportunities available to students who live in this region.

More information on Dr. McFarlane’s publications can be found under the publications tab or at https://marymount.academia.edu/MeganMcFarlane
 
Awards:

2016, Top Paper Overall, Critical and Cultural Studies Division National Communication Association: McFarlane, M. & Gomez, S. “Visualizing Race as a Choice: Refraction and Passing in Scandal.” 

2015, Outstanding Dissertation Award, Critical and Cultural Studies Division 
National Communication Association

2015, Top Paper Overall, Organizational Communication Division National Communication Association, The rhetoric of hyperplanning: The U.S. military, pregnancy, and intensified responsibilization

2015  Cheris Kramarae Outstanding Dissertation Award, Organization for the Study of Communication, Language, and Gender

2015 College of Humanities Graduate Research Award, University of Utah 
Books:

McFarlane, M.D. Militarized Maternity: Experiencing Pregnancy in the U.S. Military. Book project under contract with University of California Press.

Hasian, Jr., M., Lawson, S. & McFarlane, M. D. (2015). The rhetorical invention of America’s national security state. Lexington Press.

Hasian, Jr., M. & McFarlane, M. D. (2013). Cultural rhetorics of American exceptionalism and the bin Laden raid. Peter Lang International Academic Publishers.


Peer-Reviewed Journal Articles:

Harris, K.L., McFarlane, M.D., & Wieskamp, V. (2019). Attributions in motion: Sexual violence and the promise and peril of distributed agency. Organization. DOI: 10.1177/1350508419838697

McFarlane, M. D. (2018). Circuits of discipline: Intensified responsibilization and the double-bind of pregnancy in the U.S. military. Women’s Studies in Communication, 41(1), 22-41.DOI: 10.1080/07491409.2017.1419525

Gomez, S. & McFarlane, M. D. (2017). “It’s (Not) Handled”: Race, Gender, and Refraction in Scandal. Feminist Media Studies. (forthcoming, anticipated publication June 2017 issue 17.3. Available online). doi: 10.1080/14680777.2016.1218352

McFarlane, M. D. (2016). Visualizing the rhetorical presidency: Barack Obama in the Situation Room. Visual Communication Quarterly23(1), 3-13, doi: 10.1080/15551393.2015.1105105

McFarlane, M. D. (2015). Anti-racist white hero, the sequel: Intersections of race(ism), gender, and social justice. Critical Studies in Media Communication, 32(2), 81–95, doi:10.1080/15295036.2014.1000350

McFarlane, M. D. (2015). Breastfeeding as subversive: Mothers, mammaries and the military. International Feminist Journal of Politics, 17(2), 191–208. doi:10.1080/14616742.2013.849967

Hasian, Jr., M. & McFarlane, M. D. (2014). A critique of Jim Aune’s rhetoric, legal argumentation, and historical materialism. Argumentation and Advocacy, 50(4), 210–227.


Refereed Manuscript in Conference Proceedings:

Singer, S., Bloom-Pojar, R., Dubriwny, T., Kinney, T., McFarlane, M. D., Murawski, C., Edwell, J., & Jensen, R. E. (2018). Reevaluating our commitments: Intersectionality, interdisciplinarity and the future of feminist rhetoric. In J. Rice, C. Graham, & E. Detweiler (Eds.), Rhetorics Change/Rhetoric’s Change (Section VI). Retrieved from http://intermezzo.enculturation.net/07-rsa-2016-proceedings.htm

McFarlane, M. D. (2015). Drones, biopolitics and visuality: The aestheticization of the War on Terror. In C. H. Palczewski (Ed.), Disturbing argument: Selected works from the 18th Biennial NCA/AFA Alta Conference on Argumentation. Routledge, NY. 
 
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