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Fall 2018 DSC-101

Following completion of DSC 101 DISCOVER First-Year Seminar, students take three additional courses in their major that have been designated as inquiry (INQ) courses (some majors have more than three). These courses are designed to use teaching methods and assignments that meet Marymount University’s inquiry outcomes, so that upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to

  • formulate an appropriate inquiry or research question and provide context for it;
  • gather, evaluate, and use information or knowledge needed to support the inquiry topic, often through a literature search;
  • formulate a methodology to examine the question;
  • conduct research to answer the question, making appropriate connections among ideas and drawing conclusions; and
  • formally present the results of the inquiry project in a written product.

Questions, information-gathering, methodology, projects, and products advance in complexity as students move from second-year through senior year.


Fall 2018 DSC-101 Course Descriptions
 

DSC 101/A LEC

Mapping a Better World


We will explore how maps that describe social diversity or define countries can be used to understand some of the social changes of our time. Developing spatial literacy will enable you to interpret many of the images that appear in the media and ask probing questions that can lead to common ground. Maps have defined, proclaimed and even misled. You will learn how to read maps with healthy skepticism, identify social relationships using maps and create maps that encourage community engagement and social change. 

Instructor: Dr. Janine DeWitt

 

DSC 101/B LEC

The Bully, Bullied, and Bystander

DSC 101 is an academically rigorous foundational course for first year students. The course is designed to introduce new first year students to Marymount University and to learning in higher education.  Through the course theme, you will engage in inquiry-based learning, which is a component of Marymount’s fundamental competencies for liberal arts. In addition to DSC 101, you will take 3 courses designated by your major as inquiry (INQ). In your INQ courses you will actively participate in investigating questions and problems, some of which have no one answer. DSC 101 will help you to begin to develop the skills and abilities to succeed in these courses as you proceed through your major, as well as to find success in college and lifelong learning. In addition, DSC 101 will help improve your understanding of the intellectual, emotional and social challenges of University life and apply this knowledge to yourself. 

Instructor: Jennifer Spafford   


DSC 101/C LEC

Basic Concepts in Health and Fitness


An introduction to concepts in the fields of health and fitness. Includes a large practical component that will enhance the student’s basic skills needed in these fields.

Instructor: Alexei Wong


DSC 101/D LEC

Uncovering the Peace Cross Case for SCOTUS 2018


DSC 101 is an academically rigorous foundational course for first year students. The course is designed to introduce new first year students to Marymount University and to learning in higher education.  Through the course theme, you will engage in inquiry-based learning, which is a component of Marymount’s fundamental competencies for liberal arts. In addition to DSC 101, you will take 3 courses designated by your major as inquiry (INQ). In your INQ courses you will actively participate in investigating questions and problems, some of which have no one answer. DSC 101 will help you to begin to develop the skills and abilities to succeed in these courses as you proceed through your major, as well as to find success in college and lifelong learning. In addition, DSC 101 will help improve your understanding of the intellectual, emotional and social challenges of University life and apply this knowledge to yourself. 

Instructor: Patrick Cronin


DSC 101/E LEC

Turtling and Turtle Experiments


This course requires that you care for a pair of hatchling turtles throughout the semester.  You will make observations on these turtles and ask questions about them.  Through this observation you will design an experiment and then challenge your peers to collect the data you need to better understand your question.  A field trip will also engage the class in actively catching a few wild turtles to see what kinds of turtles live in the local ponds of Virginia.

Instructor: Todd Rimkus


DSC 101/F LEC

Create and Maintain Your Brand


DSC 101 is an academically rigorous foundational course for first year students. The course is designed to introduce new first year students to Marymount University and to learning in higher education.  Through the course theme, you will engage in inquiry-based learning, which is a component of Marymount’s fundamental competencies for liberal arts. In addition to DSC 101, you will take 3 courses designated by your major as inquiry (INQ). In your INQ courses you will actively participate in investigating questions and problems, some of which have no one answer. DSC 101 will help you to begin to develop the skills and abilities to succeed in these courses as you proceed through your major, as well as to find success in college and lifelong learning. In addition, DSC 101 will help improve your understanding of the intellectual, emotional and social challenges of University life and apply this knowledge to yourself.

Instructor: Elissa Ruffino


DSC 101/G LEC

TBD


DSC 101/H LEC

Development of Foundational Strength and Success Tools

Students will explore methods to develop personal, internal, emotional, and spiritual strength.  The instructor's lived-experiences overcoming significant educational and severe mental health challenges to live a purposeful life will establish the framework for discussions, along with reviews of others' abilities to do the same.  Students will examine the foundations of beliefs, the impacts of fear, the benefits of emotional intelligence, the value of interpersonal relationships, and the importance of developing a variety of soft skills (e.g., communication, negotiation, time management).  Also, the use of developmental exercises, self-reflections, and discussions about leveraging faith during difficult moments will be explored.  Furthermore, students will be encouraged to examine and challenge traditional thoughts about overcoming challenges/resolving conflicts through a review of individuals who overcame considerable setbacks to excel.

Instructor: Stacey Young


DSC 101/I LEC

Digital Humanities, Organizational Systems, and Bias

The advent of digital technology and digital storage of media has opened up new possibilities for accessing a variety of historical records. The challenge that libraries, researchers, and users face is how to organize these items so that they can be accessed and used. Although, organizational systems are often regarded as neutral, they are not. This course will explore some of the tools for ditial storage of media and challenge students to create systems for organization and retrieval in a class project. Then, students will help to enter items into a digital archive related to ongoing faculty research.

Instructor: Kate Koppy


DSC 101/ J LEC

Applying Critical Thinking to Research - Exploring Leadership 


This course is designed to introduce first-year students to Marymount University and also for effective strategies learning in higher education.  This course guides first-year students in Applying Critical Thinking skills to conduct research dealing with different types of leadership styles.  Learn the elements of universal standards of critical thinking to help students analyze, evaluate and reconstruct their thinking and the reasoning of others. The purpose of this course is to provide a foundation for students to be able to use critical thinking to question, obtain appropriate information, analyze the information, and draw a conclusion on the basis of the validity and reliability of the information as they conduct the research.

Instructor: La'Sandra Lockett


DSC 101/K LEC

Crimes, Criminals, and Communities 


In this Discover seminar, we will employ critical thinking skills to analyze specific criminal acts as case studies of individual wants versus community regulations. Rights, freedoms, and responsibilities to communities will be discussed. For their projects, students will pick an instance of criminal behavior, research the code (law) that deems that behavior a criminal act, and discuss that particular commission of a crime as both an individual desire and an affront to community norms.

Instructor: Sarah Fischer


DSC 101/L LEC

TBD

Instructor: Micheline Al Harrack


DSC 101/M LEC

Discover Your Creativity


The course is designed for you to experience and learn about creativity, and for you to enjoy expressing your creativity. You will engage in inquiry-based learning about creative thinking. You will participate in active research about an issue that you are interested in and write a report on that investigation. You will work in groups, make friends, and develop ways to cope with the new intellectual, emotional, and social challenges of University life.

Instructor: Ana Lado


DSC 101/N LEC

Global Competence: Preparing for Life and Work in the 21st Century


The ability to engage effectively and appropriately across cultures is essential for personal, academic, and professional success in our increasingly interconnected world. This interactive class will examine the significance of culture and the importance of global competence. By maximizing the wealth of cultural resources in Washington, DC and participating in class discussions and inquiry-based group research projects, students will develop the skills, knowledge, and understanding needed to become active and informed global citizens.

Instructor: Jennifer Crystle


DSC 101/O LEC

Trends in Popular Culture

Why do certain things become popular while others fall by the wayside? How does a type of movie, video game, music, or style become trendy? Who is behind the trends that surround us? This class will guide students as they investigate trends in popular culture, either of the past or the present.

Instructor: Sarah Ficke


DSC 101/P LEC

TBD

 

DSC 101/Q LEC

Influential Americans


Students will learn about various under-discussed but influential Americans in field of STEM, business, politics, law, literature and the arts, health, and social sciences.

Instructor: Alexandra Fee

 

DSC 101/R LEC

Hobbits, Heroes, and Hunger Games: Investigating the Hidden Order of Societies Real and Imagined

This class is designed to introduce new first-year students to Marymount University and learning in higher education. Each course section features a unique theme, emphasizing active learning, student engagement, and inquiry, which allows students to begin to develop intellectual skills and attitudes that are essential for success in college and for lifelong learning. Through participation in a variety of activities and with the support of their peer mentor, instructors, and classmates, students will improve their understanding of the intellectual, social, and emotional challenges of university life and apply this knowledge to themselves. Liberal Arts Core/University Requirements Designation: DSINQ. (3)

Instructor: Brian Hollar


DSC 101/S LEC

Outdoor Adventure: Digital Storytelling


Bring your camera or smartphone and come explore with us! We’ll be getting dirty and digital with hiking, rock scrambling, outdoor adventures, Snapchat, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and more. Learn how to capture epic selfies, perfect landscapes, colorful sunrises, or star filled skies. Social media activism will be used to inspire others to spend more time outdoors.

Instructor: Barry Erdeljon


DSC 101/T LEC

Wellness & Self-Care

This course is designed to assist students in gaining insight into their own wellness.  Students will develop awareness, knowledge, and skills with a goal for living their life more fully by exploring factors of wellness.  In addition, students will learn about the college process at Marymount, including services and resources available in order to maximize their successful academic experience.

Instructor: Dr. Michele Garofalo


DSC 101/U LEC

Discovery of the First Cities


This course will look into diaries, articles, archival reports, and books related to the discoveries of ancient cities (from China, India, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Italy, Jordan, Mexico, Pakistan, Peru, Saudi Arabia, Turkey). Our present time marks around 100 years from their discovery, which makes it appealing also to the wider public since we deal both with the actual discoveries, and with the public perception of the sites over the century in the meantime.


We shall explore issues of urban life, memory, heritage, colonialism, as well as history. While in class students will be able to simultaneously publish their findings online and do pioneering exploratory work - by producing data-driven video itineraries, posting them online and mapping the discoveries in a dynamic medium.We start by going over the tools available to you. You will learn to use existing data to develop your own material and publish it. It is not necessary that you know the technology, but it is important that you have fun doing it.

Instructor: Slobodan Mitrovic


DSC 101/ V LEC

American Health Care System


In this course, we will discover the role of states in the licensing of health care providers, the establishment of health insurance as a condition of employment and the need to provide for a payment method for those citizens who cannot afford private health insurance like those who are elderly or poor. In reviewing the above, we will discover the reason for such strong disagreement in our country over how we, as a nation, should provide payment for healthcare services. Should it all be through private insurance, all through government programs, or should we find a way to both?

Instructor: Donald Lavanty


DSC 101/ W LEC

Be the Change: Service and Leadership in Action


In our current economy, the job market is competitive and employers are looking for that special something that sets you apart. Leadership and community engagement are two areas that provide students with an opportunity to develop and demonstrate skills that are necessary in our current economic and social context. This class will provide the opportunity for students to work both independently and collaboratively, and engage with partners in the greater Arlington community.

Instructor: Anne Aichele

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