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Religious Studies

Project Title
Projects involving gendered representations in media, popular culture, or literature.
Faculty Mentor Dr. Leigh Johnson
Faculty Department Literature & Languages
Contact Information leigh.johnson@marymount.edu
Appropriate Majors Students from any major with a genuine interest in the projects are welcome. No previous knowledge of either project is required. Multiple students working as a group would be ideal.
Position Availability Fall, spring and summer (ongoing project)
Description Students might monitor or create social media sites analyzing gendered representations. Student research could include reading and collecting ideas from feminist blogs. Other research Dr. Johnson will be involved with is research on the ways that Anglo American and Mexican American women wrote about historical events such as preservation of the Alamo. Much of this work will be archival at the Library of Congress or the University of Maryland. A student could actually go to the archive, read, and make notes on the historical materials available. A final pedagogical project is research on service learning in composition classrooms, so students interested in testing service projects would be a good fit.
Date Posted January 2014
 
 
 
 
Project Title Research into literature for children and adolescents.
Faculty Mentor Dr. Bob Otten
Faculty Department Literature and Languages
Contact Information rotten@marymount.edu
Appropriate Majors Students from any major with a genuine interest in the projects are welcome. No previous knowledge of either project is required. Multiple students working as a group would be ideal.
Position Availability Fall, spring, summer (ongoing)
Description Some activities support a projected book on the central tradition in British and American literature from 1700 to the present. Other activities support collection of materials to enrich the curriculum in EN351, The Literature of Childhood and Adolescence. Students can assist through a variety of reading and research projects. These include finding and reading minor works by major writers, locating and reading rare or out-of-print texts, creating image portfolios of illustrated books and of authors, conducting primary research into contemporary writers, and exploring in person and on the web the state of commercial publishing and marketing for children’s/ adolescent literature.
Date Posted January 2014
 
 
 
 
Project Title
Research on projects about urban legends and continuing her work on medieval manuscripts and late-medieval cultural traditions.
Faculty Mentor Dr. Katie Peebles
Faculty Department Literature & Languages
Contact Information katie.peebles@marymount.edu
Appropriate Majors Students from any major with a genuine interest in the projects are welcome. No previous knowledge of either project is required.
Position Availability Fall, spring and summer (ongoing project)
Description Dr. Peebles is developing a project about urban legends and continuing her work on medieval manuscripts and late-medieval cultural traditions. Students can get involved by researching current work on legends (online or medieval), finding and analyzing manuscript images in online archives, or evaluating new digital manuscript collections.
Date Posted January 2014
 
 
 
 
Project Title Research on projects involving adaptations of Shakespeare, the films of Orson Welles, documentary film and narrative, and the use of visual composition in the classroom.
Faculty Mentor Dr. Marguerite Rippy
Faculty Department Literature and Languages
Contact Information marguerite.rippy@marymount.edu
Appropriate Majors Students from any major with a genuine interest in the projects are welcome. No previous knowledge of either project is required. Multiple students working as a group would be ideal.
Position Availability Fall, spring, summer (ongoing)
Description Students can do a variety of research projects including creating their own video logs or websites in support of the topics above, reviewing documentary films by upcoming film makers, collecting literature on pedagogy and visual composition, creating annotated bibliographies on any of the above topics, locating mid-twentieth century newspaper reviews of key performances, and studying performance photos, programs, and reviews.
Date Posted January 2014
 
 
 
 
Project Title
Changing Spirituality of Emerging Adults
Faculty Mentor Dr. Kathleen Garces-Foley
Faculty Department Philosophy, Theology and Religious Studies
Contact Information kathleen.garces-foley@marymount.edu
Appropriate Majors Humanities-related disciplines and the social sciences
Position Availability Fall, spring and summer (ongoing project)
Description This is a 3-year project to produce information, strategies, and concepts churches can use in dealing with challenges presented by contemporary young adults. It is well established that there has been a change in young adults since the 1970s; for example, fewer individuals in the 18-29 age group regularly attend religious services or identify with a particular denomination. Beneath these surface facts, church leaders recognize a host of other changes that characterize today’s young adults. For instance, they are averse to doctrinal truth, seeking instead a direct and authentic relationship with God. This study of young adults involves both survey and ethnographic research. There are a variety of research possibilities, such as creating Web surveys, holding focus groups, participant observation, Internet social networking, and in-depth study of young adult ministries.
Date Posted October 14, 2010
 
 
 
 
Project Title Comparing Multiethnic Churches Across Denominations
Faculty Mentor Dr. Kathleen Garces-Foley
Faculty Department Philosophy, Theology and Religious Studies
Contact Information kathleen.garces-foley@marymount.edu
Appropriate Majors Humanities-related disciplines and the social sciences
Position Availability Fall, spring, summer (ongoing)
Description This project examines the efforts of mainline Protestant, Roman Catholic and Evangelical efforts to create multiethnic churches. Only 93 percent of American churches are monoracial, but most would like to change that if they knew how. This study identifies strategies and models for diversifying congregations and compares how these three religious traditions approach racial diversity differently. It also examines the theological values religious leaders employ to justify outreach to targeted racial groups. Student researchers will do participant observation of local congregations and archival research. Other research opportunities include Web surveys, holding focus groups, and Web sleuthing.
Date Posted October 14, 2010